The New World Order
Orlando Nightclub Shooting: Questions and Anomalies Surround ‘Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History'

The “worst mass shooting in U.S. history” is reported to have occurred between 2 am and 5 am on Sunday morning, June 12, at Pulse, a nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The “act of terror” is said to have produced 49 dead and 53 injured. A 50th death was that of the “shooter,” identified as Omar Seddique Mateen, who was employed as a security guard since 2007 by the giant multinational security company G4S. The circumstances of the Orlando “massacre” are suspicious to say the least, with many details fitting into the existing playbook for staged shootings occurring across the U.S.

G4S, the world’s largest security company by revenue, has its US headquarters in Jupiter, Florida, but operates in “more than 100 countries,” with “more than 50,000 employees in the United States.” G4S “has the international reach and resources to meet the security needs of the global age.” The company has expressed its condolences over the tragic event and is cooperating “fully” with the FBI and other agencies who are investigating the “unspeakable tragedy.”

According to Judicial Watch, G4S is involved in a DHS operation to move illegal immigrants (“other than Mexicans”) north across the Mexican border into Arizona, releasing them without proper processing. Perhaps this is the reason that Mateen, reportedly interviewed by the FBI in 2013 and 2014, was able to keep his security clearance and gun permits although he was supposedly under investigation for possible terrorist ties.


But who was Mateen, and did he actually perpetrate “the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil since 9/11”? In light of the many questions and anomalies associated with the event, it seems doubtful that the Orlando “shooting” occurred as presented by the media. Glaring problems include the following:

– By Sunday evening, the “dead” were still supposedly inside the night club – just like the kids reportedly left inside the Sandy Hook school. Did they not take them to the hospital? Where’s the emergency protocol? (CNN)

– News reports claimed that by Sunday evening only a few of the dead had been identified. But doesn’t everyone who frequents a bar carry an ID? By 8 pm Monday the names were in – read tearfully on the air by Anderson Cooper (CNN) and listed in full on Wikipedia.


– News footage shows no dead people, or even visibly injured people, no ambulances rushing to the scene, no colored triage tarps, no EMTs swarming the site, or anything else that might prove the “massacre” actually occurred as reported. A few “injured victims” are shown casually walked or carried away from the club, with one dumped into the back of a pickup for transport to the hospital. Such scenes were played over and over on television. As with the Sandy Hook “shooting,” we are supposed to believe the reports, despite the clear lack of evidence. (CNN)

– To make up for this lack, we have a parade of witnesses, sobbing without tears and giving unconvincing performances, as seen with many recent false flag events. These include Luis Burbano, who gave interviews to several media outlets soon after the Orlando “shooting.” Like Carlos Arredondo of Boston Marathon fame, Burbano became the face of courage under duress, reportedly removing his shirt to wrap it around a man’s arm and tying another piece of his clothing to a man’s leg.


n his CNN interview, he said he put a “syringe” on the man’s arm – but then corrected this to say it was a tourniquet. Like Arredondo, Burbano is an actor, with several films to his credit.


– Interviews by assorted officials also sound scripted and strange. These include State Senator Geraldine Thompson, who tells us she is the senator for the district that includes the Pulse night club “in Tallahassee” – although Pulse is actually in Orlando. (CNN)

– Drills were involved, as with many false flag events (more on this subject is sure to come). Oddly, the June 13 online edition of the Orlando Sentinel highlighted an article originally published in 2015, regarding a drill to prepare nurses for mass casualties.


– Almost immediately, fund-raising efforts were underway on behalf of the “victims,” as is familiar from other staged events. Patty Sheehan, Orlando City Commissioner, assures us that there are already people out there raising money. In less than 24 hours, a fundraising page set up for the “victims” had raised $1.3 million, and surely more will roll in.


– Also familiar are the online posts that precede the event, documented in Yahoo listings for articles about the Orlando “shooting” that are dated June 11, one day earlier. This was the case for other false flag events, notably the Sandy Hook “shooting.”

– As for “the shooter,” Omar Seddique Mateen (alternately Omar Saddiqui Mateen) was a Florida resident, born in New York, with parents from Afghanistan, who was reportedly anti-gay (according to his father). His family is more than suspicious, with his father, Seddique Mateen, supposedly running for the presidency of Afghanistan, and well acquainted with U.S. Congressmen and officials in the State Department.

– Omar Mateen was supposedly on the FBI’s radar, as already mentioned, but somehow the feds didn’t connect the dots. This is a common trope with all U.S. false flag events, beginning with 9/11. We are supposed to believe that the intelligence behemoth just doesn’t have the capabilities to recognize a terrorist threat, despite more than $50 billion allocated per year to the 16 intel agencies. As with Boston Marathon “bomber,” Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Mateen was known to the authorities, who let him proceed unfettered.

– Mateen wreaked havoc with “at least two guns,” a Sig Sauer AR-15 style assault rifle and a Glock handgun. This fits the weapons profile of other alleged perpetrators of “mass shooting” events, including Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik (San Bernardino) and Adam Lanza (Sandy Hook).


– Most of these “mass killers” have bought their guns legally, obtaining licenses and passing background checks. According to the New York Times article cited above, “at least eight gunmen had criminal histories or documented mental health problems that did not prevent them from obtaining their weapons.” Mateen is no exception, fitting the profile perfectly, exhibiting “mental health problems,” according to his ex-wife, who supposedly had to be rescued from the marriage by her parents.


– Mateen has been judged “self radicalized” and a lone-wolf, home-grown terrorist – by all news sources. This was the case with other “terrorist” actors, including the San Bernardino “shooters.” Marco Rubio went on record to say that homegrown terrorism is the biggest threat our country faces – his fear is that “we’re gonna see more of this.” (CNN) And no doubt we will.

– All sources have reported that Mateen called 911 at 20 minutes into the attack and pledged allegiance to ISIS (over the phone) and also mentioned the “Boston bombers” as inspiration. (The tape has not been released.) This is patently ridiculous: did no one in the club think to jump the “killer” as he took time out to make this call? This kind of exhibitionism – serving to identify the perpetrator and associate him/her with the terrorist organization of choice – was seen in the Paris Charlie Hebdo caper, with Amedy Coulibaly calling BFMTV from the kosher Hyper Cacher Supermarket to tell them his name and announce his connection to the Islamic extremist Kouachi brothers .


– Finally, Mateen was conveniently killed by the police (or was he?), with only one officer sustaining a hit – but luckily the bullet was deflected by his Kevlar helmet. This has occurred with virtually all other false flag rampages, a notable exception being the Boston Marathon “bombing,” with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev reported captured and in prison – unless he was actually killed while hiding in the boat.

One can find many other correspondences between the various staged events, with the Orlando “shooting” fitting comfortably into the paradigm. In each case, a saddened President Obama makes a heart-wrenching statement to the press, in some instances seeming to weep. In his words, Orlando was “an act of terror and an act of hate.” But love will prevail – as we are reminded again and again.

Here, as always, the agenda is multi-purpose: gun control, mental health supervision, increased surveillance of the populace, bolstering of the intelligence services, militarization of local law enforcement, further commitment to the “War on Terror” whether abroad or at home, and, in this case, the LGBT program – in a strategy devised by the elites and programmed by the media, with the people used as dupes.

By: memoryholeblog.com



After Orlando Shooting, ‘False Flag’ and ‘Crisis Actor’ Conspiracy Theories Surface

After the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., on June 12, Twitter brimmed with news reports of the carnage. But some posts on the massacre that claimed 49 lives also included a curious phrase: “false flag.”

It was a code used by conspiracy theorists to signal their belief that the government had staged the massacre and the information the public was reading and hearing from the mainstream media was untrue.

The victims in the shooting? They were “crisis actors” hired to promote the story as a pretext to impose tighter gun restrictions, the theory goes.

It is easy to dismiss such beliefs as preposterous and to think of them as coming from a paranoid fringe of society that deeply distrusts the government, but such theories are pervasive. It is difficult to gauge how many people believe these stories, but a general search of YouTube for false-flag videos brought up more than 700,000 results.

The term false flag relates to naval warfare when a ship would fly a flag that would conceal its true identity as a way to lure an enemy closer. Today, it is commonly a shorthand for an act of deception.

Conspiracy theorists have applied the label to high-profile attacks, including the shootings by a husband and wife last year in San Bernardino, Calif., that killed 14; the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in 2012 that left 26 dead; and the attack at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., in 2007 that killed 33.

The phrase has even been used to doubt the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Jesse Walker, the author of “The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory,” said fear, the human need to find patterns and tell stories, and the recognition that conspiracies are not impossible help fuel such theories. The stories — no matter how outlandish — can bring meaning and a measure of comfort in a world that can make no sense, he said.

False-flag theories have long been around. One focused on the assassination attempt in 1835 of President Andrew Jackson, during which the president fought off a gunman whose two weapons misfired. Conspiracy theorists at the time believed Jackson had hired the gunman as a way to drum up sympathy for himself, Mr. Walker said.

Unlike the 1800s, stories today benefit from instant delivery through the internet and social media. One of the better-known purveyors is Alex Jones, who hosts an internet show at the website infowars.com. The day of the Orlando shooting, he posted a video in which he asserted that the government had let the massacre happen so it could pass “hate laws to deal with right-wingers” and to disarm gun owners. He did not respond to an email seeking comment .

Mike Rothschild of Pasadena, Calif., who has researched and written about conspiracy theories, described the world of false-flag believers as a “bank of awakened internet sleuths that has got it all figured out.” They see it as their duty to warn others about secret elites in government who are plotting against citizens, he said.

If overwhelming concrete evidence debunks the theorists’ notions, it only reinforces their ideas, said Chip Berlet, a researcher of radical-right movements and retired analyst at Political Research Associates, a left-leaning think tank in Somerville, Mass. For conspiracy believers, explaining it away “shows how smart the enemy really is,” he said.

Rob Brotherton, a psychologist and science journalist who wrote “Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories,” said it is not just false-flaggers who seek connections and hidden meanings in world events.

“Everybody loves a story with a good plot twist, which is basically what conspiracy theories are,” he wrote in an email. “Conspiracy theories arguably just have slightly different logic and standards of evidence.”

But does paying attention to such theories give them legitimacy? Mr. Rothschild said it was better for the public to be knowledgeable about rather than blindsided by such stories.

Another conspiracy researcher, Joseph E. Uscinski, a political science professor at the University of Miami, has noted that such theories rarely go unchallenged and are frequently debunked on the internet, Mr. Brotherton said.

Still, trying to quash conspiracists can be a no-win proposition.

“For someone who believes in a conspiracy, you can’t go wrong,” Derek Arnold, who teaches communications at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, wrote in an email.

“If the powers that be give you information that is against your theory, it’s a lie; if it supports your theory, you are even more vindicated. And if they stay silent, it’s because you’ve got something to hide.”


By: nytimes.com




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